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antipathy toward the role of government? >> generally, yes. in this particular instance, not yet. i worry about the future. there will be financial successes in the future. above there will be a need for the government to ride to the rescue. my fear is that given the bad name a lot of these programs have undeservedly gotten we will not have the political will to do it again. i'm pretty sure it happened next week we do not have the political will. it will not happen next week. >> why is it that five years after the financial crisis there is still a philosophical debate in america between government and less-government? why have we not decided this is what works and this is what does not? >> i do not think we will ever decide this. we are the anti-government government. you remember our origins. it was leaving the british in getting local control. anti-governmentism has always been part of the american ideologies. for the most part in the broad picture, it is more at the lip service level than at the pragmatic level. we worship jefferson and we follow hamilton. the government does plenty he
of hannity. now for the next hour we are going to be taking a look at the bills of government in washington, d.c. and how it is making a lot of people very rich with your hard-earned money. we spent author peter sweitzer to our nation's capitol to take us inside america's biggest boom town. take a look. >> washington, d.c., the nation's capitol. the seat of federal power. increasingly a town that is is very rich. the local native american named the river platomic which means where goods are offloaded or where tribute is paid. today that tribute comes in the form of trillions of dollars of taxpayer money that floods into this city every year. well one out of every six americans worries about where their next meal is coming from, washington, d.c. has the highest rate of fine wine consumption in the united states. while one out of four americans has a mortgage that is under water seven of the 10 wealthiest counties in the united states are counties around this region washington, d.c. now has the highest per capita income in the entire united states. they just passed silicone valley. you are go
immigration? >> and discernible. john: marijuana. >> i expect the federal government to come in. john: that is our show tonight. >> and now john stossel. ♪ john: to was that guy? anyway, this monday our nation's capital looked like a marquee when a new king is ground. thousands of plot, a cheer. many act like subjects worshiping nobility. economic troubles, why all the pomp? watching, i wondered, should our capital be called imperial washington? maybe ago to far. senator john barrasso attended the inauguration joining us from washington. my imperial washington seems to be a minority opinion. in my being unfair? >> i have been to every inauguration since i was in my dad took me to john kennedy's inauguration this inauguration, i tell you, i am less concerned about what happens one day than i am concerned about what this president plans to do for the next four years as an imperial president with rules and regulations and red tape and the czars, the recess appointments rather than actually realizing this is one of three branches of government. at think he believes he is the king. john:
of "hannity". for the next hour we are taking a look at the business of government in washington, d.c. and how it is making a lot of people very rich with your hard earned money. we spent author peter switzer to our nation's capital to take us inside this new american boom town. take a look. >> today the tribute comes in the form of trillions of dollars of tax payer money that floods into this city every year. >> while one out of every 6 americans worries about where their next meal is coming from, washington, d.c. has the highest rate of fine wine consumption in the united states. while one out of four americans has a mortgage that is under water, seven of the ten wealthiest counties in the united states are counties around this region. washington, d.c. now has the highest per capita income in the entire united states. they just passed silicone valley. >> you are going to discover that washington, d.c., a town that used to be a town of sleepy bureaucrats is now a town of moz ratty deal moz rot at this deal fine wine luxurious homes and luxurious shops. it's a washington, d.c. a lot of people
she served as national security and state department, negotiated the u.s. government -- with u.s. government with iranian officials here she's nice to hear professor lecture at american university in washington. the writing has appeared in "the new york times," "politico," foreign policy and washington monthly among others. they came to us last night from virginia, took a late night train and what i'd like to do is turn it over to you for your thoughts and comments to start off. >> thank you very much. i'm going to start for us today. let me thank you much for hosting us to thank you for coming. it's an honor pleasure and we look forward to nature scene discussion today. i'm going to start with two provocative themes from our new book, "going to tehran: why the united states must come to terms with the islamic republic of iran". the first of these means, and these two get at the heart of our book. the united states is today enhanced and for the past two years a power and relative decline in the middle east. the second core team as the biggest beneficiary of american ongoing dec
in dealing with disasters. the japanese government began launching intelligence-gathering satellites in reaction to north korea's missile tests in 1998. with this launch, government officials completed a plan's reconnaisance system. it consisted of two radar satellites and rocket satellites. malfunctioning satellites put them ten years behind schedule. >>> african leaders are discussing measures to restore regional peace in the wake of the algerian hostile crisis. the two-day summit of the african union opened in the capital on sunday. the block consists of 54 nations and territories. at the start of the conference, au commission chairperson zuma spoke about the ongoing conflict between the french military and islamist extremists in mali. >> without the security, no country of religion can expect prosperity. >> reporter: developers say the chaos in mali led to the seizure of agents in algeria in which 47 soldiers died or were unaccounted for. they said the media needs to speed up work to get a commission. he is attending the meeting as an observer. he expressed japan's intentions to
action own territorial disputes close to home. >> translator: the government will properly develop and better administer japanese islands near borders with other nations and boost security there. i declare that we'll protect the lives and property of japanese nationals and protect our country's territory. >> prime minister abe closed his speech by saying only that people of japan can make the country strong. . >>> prime minister abe and barack obama are expected to meet in washington. u.s. ties gave us his perspective on the important issues facing the alliance. michael green served on the white house national security council as director of asian affairs under the bush administration. he spoke with nhk world. >> strategically, the u.s. and japan have a common interest in setting a high standard for transparency, rule of law and market access. >> michael green believes japan has a lot to gain by joining negotiations for the transpacific partnership free trade agreement or ttp. he says it would improve the country's standing with the u.s. and within asia. and he says it would send a
was like. here the government is offering them money to give up guns and reintegrate themselves into village communities. it is having mixed results. >> the man behind me were told the problem we have is no means of knowing. even if they are, the numbers are so very small. to 6000 integrating. >> the details are registered diametrically. while we were there, at a ballmer killed 3. -- a bomber killed three. nato has fought this to a stalemate. it has not defeated it. it is leading the afghan authorities and decide to to trust in how to stop this country once again. >> look what afghanistan may look like after the nato forces withdraw. some other news around the world. violence in cairo is continuing for a fifth day after president marcie went. he also pose a curtsey in areas where dozens have now been killed. police fired tear gas. the cause of a series of technical problems with boeing's new dreamliner is still not known. on monday they clear the company that makes batteries for the airline. they're now focusing on equipment's that matters the batteries performance. after days o
shan't for more see to step down. -- chant for morsi to step down. our guest says the government should have been prepared. >> we should not have been at this stage. the needless deaths were unnecessary, and the government was largely responsible for that. everyone knows tensions were incredibly high a in anticipation of the verdict for the 2012 february rampage that left 70 people dead, and there were major protests in cairo on thursday by the supporters of the opposition team, so clearly the government should have been prepared for what occurred on saturday, and they were not, and that is criminally negligent, so we should not have high and deaths occur the day, and we should not have been the state we are in now, which is a state of emergency. i am skeptical there is going to be meaningful dialogue taking place. what many people have come to the conclusion that the calls for dialogue have been less than fully is sincere. it is not clear what kind of inclusion would take place as a measure of the -- as a result of sie dialogue, so mr. mor has lost credibility. it is worth when separat
and alabama, but you're within one system of governance. you have not only one currency, but you have one national budget and one fiscal deficit. in europe that was never true. >> in the states, you know that you have your local government, you have your state government, and you have your federal government. you pretty much know the architecture of who governs, who legislates, and who runs the show. europe, it's a little more complicated. you start with the national governments and they have their own constituencies, their own electorates to represent. now add to that a layer of eurozone institutions, so organizations, institutions that were built to deal with europe and the eurozone. one of them is the european commission, which is based in brussels and they are essentially the administrators and the bureaucrats of the european project. but also crucially, in frankfurt, the european central bank, which is the central bank for all 17 eurozone countries and the closest thing that the euro has to a fed, only it doesn't perceive itself as powerful as the fed. >> many people knew there would
in the case regarding the legality of some of the charges. attempts by the u.s. government to legitimatize these military tribunals have been complicated by the fact that the only two convictions of guantanamo bay prisoners via tribunals have been reversed by civilian appeals courts. the administration is also facing heat over its continued reliance on drone strikes. according to figures compiled by the london-based bureau of investigative journalism, the u.s. has conducted 362 drone strikes in pakistan since 2004 with 128 in 2010 alone. the program's covert nature has alarmed civil rights activists and the human rights council has now launched an investigation into drone attacks connected to civilian casualties. joining us now to discuss the war on terror is the director of the aclu, national security project, hannah. thanks for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> this is a conversation that i think gradually is taking more of a role on center stage. especially with the appointment of john brennan and as we look at john kerry and chuck hagel. in terms of u.s. national security and
works for the government who comes into possession of closely held sensitive information regarding the national defense or the identity of a covert agent that it is critical that information remains secure and not into the public domain are be shared with others who do not have authorized access to it. >> the judge in the case told kiriakou she would have sentenced him to more jail time if not for the limits imposed by the plea deal. kiriakou's supporters say he has been unfairly targeted in the obama administration's crackdown on government was a lower is. in a statement urging president obama to commute kiriakou's sentence, agreed signatories including attorneys and former cia officers said -- speaking after his sentencing, kiriakou thanked what he said were a number of intelligence officials who supported his cause. >> the dozens of former and active duty cia officers and fbi agents and assisting u.s. attorneys to rally to my side, although most had to do so privately, i thank them for their cards, emails, donations to my defense fund. it was their friendship and support of my f
the impression that this is the mongolian government retaking towns and not a foreign army conquering them. >> the army needs to win the confidence of ordinary people. when the rebels took over the north, the army simply ran away. the french involvement has changed everything. >> it has been very difficult, we need a lot of logistical support and help with intelligence and communications. this is what we need to finish this operation. >> this group as a prisoner. they say that he is a rebel. the army has been accused of summary executions. they lead the prisoner away. senior french officers commanding the operations fly to the front lines. they have come to give the troops there final briefing. >> many of the rebels have left and have told al-jazeera that they will return. do you know where they have banished to and in what capacity they will come back? >> i think that whether they will comeback is partly to the extent that they have grass- roots support in timbuktu itself. it also depends on the 6000 strong african forces meant to be assembling in mali. the french hold the territory that
government actually reacted quite favorably and also responded to our demand with a change, a certain change in their policies. i must admit that i looked with a certain degree of concern at japan right now. for europe, too, it's going to be important, um, that the big injection of liquidity that was given into the markets for the sake of the banks is siphoned off again. but i think the ecb is, actually, here a very positive force. they're playing a very positive role, and they will see to it that one refrains from the policy of manipulation and that, um, one pursues a policy that actually reflects the situation as it is that everyone is doing it as is the ecb. i think we would have less problems all over the world, but that's about the extent of my comment. [speaking german] >> translator: since you've touched upon central banks, what exactly are the objectives of central banks? we have the federal reserve that has set itself an additional objective, we've seen the more recent developments in japan. what did you think about the independence? you touched upon it, alluded to it. maybe you cou
terrorism. on tuesday, his government sacked 5600 troops. why is it, is this such kept into what the prime minister said and what the prime minister does? >> i think the honorable gentleman as an important question and i do not deny for one second that we've had to take difficult decisions about defense spending in our country. but let me make this point. at 33 billion pounds a year we have the fourth largest defense budget anywhere in the world, and i think it is her important that we make sure we have the right scale and shape of our forces and they have the right capabilities. that is what in the defense review we are investing in drones, special forces, investing more in key and intelligence capabilities making sure that we also have the aircraft we need to make sure we have highly mobile armed forces. i am incredibly proud of what our armed forces do, and because we are balancing their budgets to will be better equipped for the future. >> sixty-eight years ago this sunday than not see concentration and extermination camps auschwitz was liberated. as we mark holocaust memorial day, wil
with cuts in other areas of government. we have shown how to protect defense spending by cutting spending in other areas. in our budget last year, we did take money out of defense. just not nearly as much as the president seems to want to. but we think the sequesters will happen because the democrats have opposed our efforts to replace those cuts with others and offered no alternatives. >> is this worth shutting the government down over? >> no one is talking about shutting the government down. >> well, it's a piece of the leverage that conservatives have. you didn't want to fight over the debt ceiling because you thought you can't do that, you have to pay the government's bills. do you think this fight over priority is worth shutting the government down? >> we're not interested in shutting the government down. what happens on march 1 is spending goes down automatically. march 27 is when the moment you're talking about, the continuing resolution expires. we are more than happy to keep spending at those levels going on into the future while we debate how to balance the budget, grow the econ
different parts of the city, the military camp guarded government buildings. protesters attacked a police station and torched the club. military helicopters have been hovering as this situation here remains tense. the violence has left the part of the city looking like a ghost town with people huddled in their homes fearing more deaths. go to the conflict in mali now where a conflict by french and mali and forces against islamic forces are making significant gains. the french and mali and troops have reached timbuktu. they reclaimed a strategically important town in the northeast. the fight to regain total control continues elsewhere. there have been french air strikes in one town. african leaders have been told their response to the crisis in mali has been too slow. the head of the african union chairman made the comments as the opening of the body summit in ethiopia. >> a stinging criticism of african leaders came from no less a figure that african union boss of the outgoing chairman, president of the need. he told delegates the deployment of peacekeepers had taken far too long. >> how
on government audits and oversight, and looking forward to working with this committee. i want to say that this is a very sound piece of legislation. it makes a great deal of sense. i like the fact that we are among the things conforming with state laws; it makes a great deal of sense to also provide certainty and clarity for the subcontractors that are impacted by this issue. and i would like to ask that my name be added as a cosponsor. >> chair: thank you very much supervisor. i would like to say that the small business commission has also acted to support this legislation as well. >> i make a motion to move this forward, the process of recommendation. >> chair: we can do that without objection. item 2. gvl(gavel) clk>> clerk calonsag: performance audit housing authority. >> chair: this is brought by a number of supervisors. supervisor campos, do you have opening comments? >> supervisor campos: i will be brief in my comments. since i was elected supervisor four years ago, we have heard from time to time from a number of residents from the public housing developments about i
government's position on britain's role in the eu. he pledged to hold a referendum on britain's future in the eshoo if conservatives win the next election. he took questions from the british house of commons. this is 35 minutes. >> prime minister. >> question number one a, dilma, mr. speaker. -- thank you, mr. speaker. i am sure the whole house will wish to draw any in paying attribute to david robert shaw. he died and queen elizabeth hospital birmingham last wednesday as a result of wounds that he sustained in afghanistan. he gave his life for the safety of the british people, and his incredibly great contribution must never be forgotten. our profound condolences are with his loved ones. this morning, i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others, and in addition to my duties in this house i shall have a further meetings today. >> i am sure the whole house and the whole country would want to associate themselves with the prime minister's comments about david robert shaw. on monday, the prime minister stated that the task for our generation was to struggle against terrorism. on
to the honorable member that the use of food banks increased 10 times under the last labour government. >> will be prime minister join me in paying tribute to all the athletes who took part in the british -- held in my constituency? will be prime minister encourage people to register which will help us save lives of? >> i certainly could be to all those who took part in the british transplant games into the many volunteers who made these games such a success. i think gillian did a fantastic job in hosting the games. is quite right to raise this issue. they are a testament to the benefit of transplantation and i would encourage people to do as he says. >> seventy-seven of our young people with the most complex special needs face being without places next year because of government cuts. why should the most vulnerable young people in my constituency pay the price for his economic failures? >> first of all let me make the point to the honorable lady that the recent were having to make cuts is because of the mess left by her government. no one wants have to make the difficult decisions we'
more benefits from the federal government than they pay back in taxes. we're getting to a society where we have a net majority of takers versus makers. >> jon: you are defining taker as as 70% of society. that's (bleep) takers. imagine how high that percentage would be if he included social security and medicare recipients on the taker list. you don't have to imagine it because it wouldn't be higher because it includes it on the taker list, social security and medicare according to the tax foundation report sighted by a paul reya, sorry ryan. if you don't include social security and medicare on the takers list you can't get to romney's more generous 47% taker to maker ratio. if takers were just welfare recipients it was 2%. i have to tell you nobody ever won an election demonizing such a small percentage of americans. well, hardly anyone. [ laughter ] the idea that republicans characterized even social security and medicare as halmakes of a takers society -- hallmarks of a taker society i'll let the speakers describe it. >> we built it. >> you better believe they built it. >> performing
of tripartheid branches that notably do not have enough power to govern alone. madisonian austin. or four congresses have been the worst in the history of united states of the total abandonment of the check and balance. fact he is by letting court liberal and democratic values. the republicans took that same position under bush says they are silent. the result is, we have now check on that authority. to make matters worse, the court system has largely been taken offline. when president obama said that he can define whether something is a war and therefore circumvent congress and intervene in the libyan civil about intervening in syria -- i went to the core with members of congress and the challenge a democrat and republican and these are the good members. we said you are circumventing a clear requirement of the constitution. we could not get a hearing because the courts of limited standing, as it is called. there are now many constitutional violations that cannot be subject to judicial review because no one has standing. we have a latent violations of the constitution and we literally can
to a large variety of the government sectors. in february 2008 the jewish coalition held a conference against human trafficking which included agencies such as the san francisco commission on the status of women, representative of the mayor's office and other nonprofits. this event also attracted members of the state assembly and a few congressional offices. at a meeting following our conference a i was asked to chair the larger group and my condition was that there be a cochair from the mayor's office at that time was catherine dodd. the san francisco collaborative against human traffic was born. in 2010 - from the beginning emily morassie (sounds like) executive director of the san francisco commission on the status of women was always involved as well as theresa sparks, executive director of the human rights commission. they were not only the core of the beginning but also generously offered to help us and support us and today that is where we are housed. we have a membership of over 28 agencies public and private representing a wide area of government agencies, law enforcem
in the third quarter. >> he also weighed in on the irish government's efforts to boost its economy, saying progress was being made, but insisted more could be done. >> the government has not necessarily addressed all the issues. they've done well and they've certainly addressed certain aspects of the cost space within ireland. but for those companies, particularly retailers, we're operating within the irish domestic market exclusively, it's a very, very different environment with awkward rent reviews, public sector costs are highly uncompetitive right across costs such as wages. other local authority charges on retailers in particular and those with large industrial premises within the country and we also have a domestic mortgage crisis with the banks. >> now, ryanair shares are under pressure today. you can see they're trading down by better than 2%, in fact, taking the sector down, too. ez-jet is one of the worst performers on the stoxx 600 today. ryanair is roughly flat over the past seven days, so marginally higher from where we were a week ago on the back of those comments. >>> we are
a border security would be beefed up and the government would improve its tracking of current visa holders. the senators also want to grant more green cards to highly educated immigrants and would allow more lower-skilled workers into the country especially for agricultural purposes. finally, the agreement calls for an effective verification system to crack down on employers who hire workers in the country illegally. in 2006 and 2007, similar efforts to fix the nation's patchwork of immigration laws failed under both republican and democratically controlled congresses but democratic senator chuck sheumer of new york said this time will be different. >> the politics on this issue have been turn upsidedown. for the first time ever there's more political risk in opposing immigration reform than in supporting it. >> ifill: indeed this new effort comes on the heels of last year's election in which president obama won seven of every ten hispanic votes in his victory over republican mitt romney. senator john mccain of arizona said that's the key reason his party must now get on board. >> election
and the government would improve its tracking of current visa holders. the senators also want to grant more green cards to highly educated immigrants and would allow more lower-skilled workers into the country especially for agricultural purposes. finally the agreement calls for an effective verification system to crack down on employers who hire workers in the country illegally. in 2006 and 2007 similar efforts to fix the nation's patchwork of immigration laws failed under both republican and democratically controlled congresses but democratic senator chuck sheumer of new york said this time will be different. >> the politics on this issue have been turn upsidedown. for the first time ever there's more political risk in opposing immigration reform than in supporting it. >> ifill: indeed this new effort comes on the heels of last year's election in which president obama won seven of every ten hispanic votes in his victory over republican mitt romney. senator john mccain of arizona said that's the key reason his party must now get on board. >> elections. elections. the republican party is losing t
to the government can become prohibitive at times. so at life technologies what we've done is we try to focus our investments on technology that while the technology itself may be expensive, if you look holistically at the total cost of that patient event, it's significantly reducing the overall cost. let me tell you what i mean by that. if you have an $80,000 cancer drug regiment that only works in 25 percent of the patients, if we run a thousand dollar test and pick the 80% that don't receive benefit from that drug, not only do we spare the patient the side effects, we save health care a tremendous amount of cost. the administration, the obama administration a few years ago when we were in the throes of trying to figure out what we were going to do about health care, they used to quote some data, that $70 billion in 2008 was spent on oncology drugs and somewhere between 20 and 25 billion had no impact on the patient. so if we were to spend three billion in these amazing test capabilities to pick the 25 billion that wasn't going to respond, you save the overall health care costs. so we really ar
.s. in the world. if there is a humanitarian crisis, it is justifiable to enter the country to stop the government from doing that. but if its is you are just unseating leaders because they're not friendly to u.s. business interests or you are replacing them with leaders who are firmly to u.s. business interests, that it does become imperialism. bowlines are really blurry and we have to watch our step. military industrial complex in this country is really powerful. i don't want it to spill over to the rest of the world and become the imperialists. host: a few tweets -- and joseph writes -- that is assessing the passed four years. i want to read from the oliver north peace that we mentioned earlier from the washington times, talking about hillary clinton and her assessment of her work. it says it has created opportunities for u.s. citizens in places that have benefited our nation. oliver north is the host of stories."ar mike is next on the republican line in indianapolis. caller: in the last four years, the only factor in the cap of hillary clinton is the miles she has trouble. a relationship to in
schools, also local governments and businesses that have changed their status today. you can see those along bottom of your screen and also on our web site, myfoxdc.com. i'm sarah simmons. >> i'm wisdom martin. let's get a quick check of the weather. sitting in for tucker barnes, gwen is here. >> some of you not seeing very much or anything at all. some of you to the south and west of d.c. are in the thick of it. here is a look at our fox aaccu- weather radar and you can see the wide area in the pink here. that is a mixture of sleet and freezing rain a and a little bit of light rain to the north of fredericksburg. all of this is moving its way to the east. to our weather maps. here is a look at the area under a winter weather advisory right now. this is in effect through until 10:00 this morning. garrett county, maryland is under a winter storm warning. temperatures right now into the 30s pretty much everywhere. we are expecting to get into the low 40s. yesterday, we reached 3 degrees at national. but we are expecting today to see at least 41 degrees with some breezy winds. we'll have
. the crowd had a blast. it was a speech that does represent his overall view of governing. >> colby, a to f? >> strong b, not so much on the eloquence, but on laying out his agenda and what he wants to accomplish. historic in a way as well. he is the first president to use the word "gay" in an inaugural address, and i think that is where the country is heading. he laid down a marker for this when he talked abut equality. >> mark? >> establishing my grading system at the outset, i give a's second,ln, roosevelt's and kennedy paused only. i would give obama a b, a bb- plus. he was far more surefooted than had been in the past. since the member 6 he has shown a far clearer sense of what he wants to do. i think this was a communitarian address, a lot more than the individualism and we have heard in recent past. >> charles? >> i will buck the tide of grade inflation that has infected the panel. if you are a liberal, this was an a plus, a declaration of a liberal future. declaration that 30 years of conservative ascendancy that began with a ragged's inaugural where he stated in a minute and a half
more memories i want to share. one deals with government and jazz. chris always wanted to work for the state department. he always wanted to be involved in the foreign service. he took the foreign service exam when we were undergrads at cal. he came back the first time, pleased with results on the written but felt he didn't do so well on the orals. the question that seemed to trip him up and left him perplexed was the following. mr. stevens, please compare american government and jazz music. chris told us he didn't quite know how to handle that question. my suggestion involved people blowing loudly on their horns or banging loud' on their drums was not terribly helpful. we decided to ask questions to trip up the applicant. we didn't have the internet to find a quick answer but figured it out. though chris may not have come up with the answer during that exam he certainly lived the message taught by this interesting comparison. both american democracy and jazz music involved ongoing experimentation. they involve unscripted action and improvisation as we figure out the best way t
single agency of state government to cut specific regulations and red tape. we thought fracking was such a big deal. we have a huge amount of natural gas. horizontal drilling and fracking, natural gas has great potential benefits. much cleaner than coal. it is $1.75 per gallon equivalent to less-expensive. it keeps jobs here and does not send billions of dollars to a dictatorship. there is fear about what happens and we sat down with halliburton and the oil and gas services companies. we understand they have trade secrets. we showed what the ingredients are and it took a six months but we got the environmental defense fund to claim victory and have halliburton claim victory. here is a transparency, set of regulations that will protect the public and settle down all the hysteria and kirk -- furor about fracking. i did it when i was a kid diyala this. how do we get past that fear and uncertainty and create some sort of predictability to business needs? that became a symbol for our issues. to find the appropriate compromise so we can get on to the next problem. >> would you like to
of resistance. but we deal with that through enlightened government policies, feedback, and changing them when we find they do not work. and encouraging the private sector where the ideas come up. i do not think -- steve jobs working in his career came up with stuff. i did not know that steve jobs was working in that group on the computer. we want to have space for that. we need space for innovation, it is a constant challenge. the power of the conventional is so overwhelming and the convergence is so powerful that to try to innovate is exhausting in government. let me tell you. in spite of that, i am ready for several more years of innovation. i hope you are. i hope california is. [laughter] [applause] >> for this next question, let's pretend that president obama is sitting in this chair. but pretend this is a private room -- let's pretend this is a private room. we need everyone out there to be quiet. if you were here along with the president, what are the two things you would tell him you need to make your state more competitive or all states more competitive? >> i think and i am an unabash
substantially more, on the federal government side, as an inducement to states and local governments to make the investments they need to make. man: but the federal role is going to continue to be diminished because of so many competing demands. so the expectation that the federal government will step in and infuse a lot of capital into water infrastructure, i think, is doubtful. and whether they should or not, i think, will continue to be debated. narrator: where money continues to be elusive, some cities and towns are turning their assets over to private companies, hoping the private sector can find the solutions they cannot. man: in the u.s., roughly 90% of all water and wastewater systems are still publicly owned and publicly managed. the remaining 10% are managed by privately held companies. man: the private sector has learned to become very efficient, and frequently a municipality can save themselves a significant amount of money by bringing in a private company. this is not true in all cases. there are some exceptionally well-run municipalities, but they do have to deal with a city go
of times -- young children. i have interviewed himsel mysela couple of times. >> what does the government have to say? >> they make it clear that this is queen beatrix's own choice. the monarchy in the netherlands forms part of the government am a part of politics, part of parliament -- government, part of politics, part of parliament. there are many who believe that this role should be left involved in -- less involved in parliament and more ceremonial. there is a trend toward modernization of the monarchy. when willem alexander takes over, things will stay as they are for the moment, at least. >> on to other news -- more violence in egypt. police and protesters have clashed in cairo and the city of port said on day five of the latest crisis to hit the country. >> it is becoming a test of the authority of president mohammad morrissey and his muslim brotherhood. he announced the state in emergency -- president mohammed morrissey -- mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood. he announced a state of emergency in three areas. >> they have asked all egyptians to express themselves peacefully.
who do not even understand what their job is, who do not understand the government's job is to take care of its people, we are never going anywhere in the country, because we deal with not so every single day. -- with nuts every single day. these people care nothing -- care about nothing but themselves. [applause] tavis: let me ask you something. i am like roseanne. i am feeling sorry for you. i am going to push too high in my prayers. on a serious note, we saw the play out in the fiscal cliff negotiation, and we are going to see this in the debt ceiling. if you are right about this, there are people in trends in congress. they come from districts. they come from states where this is not their issue, so congress is polarized around the issue of poverty. we said there is a bipartisan consensus parliament does not matter. if you are right about your assessment, how do we imagine the plight of the four is going to get a dress? >> just what you have been giving these lawyers about. -- these blurbs about. people have to stop being silent. anytime i get a phone call in my office i believe
the cases about can the government fly over your home and use technology that emanates from your home? we have had questions about gps navigators and we will have many market and the forefathers had no idea and the computer chips would come in and benjamin franklin i felt very much. [laughter] he never imagined these today. if they used terms that were more specific than they did, we wouldn't have been given the opportunity for the experience so they did a mixture of some very things. you can't do this, what did we forget about today you can't court of the militia in people's homes except in times of war. that's pretty specific but there were many other things. it gives a concept as we are guided by that concept. >> what worries you about the constitution, are there any trends, issues that he might have gura on? [laughter] i don't think this is before they talk about it, but i will talk about one thing the recent elections in have any gratification about. our forefathers were citizens statesman. back then by the way they were all meant so that's why i use the word statesman. they were peo
of the individuals and from the strength of civil society and not the government, which is what obama leaves -- believes is the objection of connectivity. if all of that is true, which i think it is, then i think four more years on the course of drift, on the course of expanding the government at the expense of the private sector will have results that will be unmistakable and there will be a shift away from it which makes me rather optimistic about the future in the medium term though i'm not that optimistic about the short term. >> let's delve into more of the causes of it, the election result, and this may be a false choice, but to what extent do you think the outcome had to do with romney's weaknesses as an anecdote and how much had to do with the content he was trying to sell and perhaps the staleness of it, how much was just circumstances, the economy wasn't bad enough to fire obama and the republican party, its brand was still being dragged down with the association through the financial crisis in iraq and sundry other leftovers of the bush years? >> i think the clearest way to look a
their new government and president mohammed more seats. today's clashes marking the to dish your anniversary if -- joined by fox his middle east and terrorism expert and analysts. good to have you here. let's start with what is happening in egypt. give us a sense of -- this has been going on for some time. to what affect? >> well, look, this is a defining moment. what we see right now on the streets of egypt, two years after the first revolution, a second revolution. those who are organizing these demonstrations on the ground, as we see in the pictures, the same people who started the original arabs bring in cairo two years ago. so you have those young people, secular, liberal, women's movement minorities rising against the muslim brotherhood government regime. this is an important moment for the international committee to make a choice. we are doing is sending more weapons instead of more support to the use. lou: and what kind of support are those who are demonstrating in the streets of cairo and drought egypt today, what kind of support are they receiving from the international community,
libyans were amazed at the site of a senior government official doing mundane activities without a huge entourage and demanding vip treatment. chris had a great knowledge of libyan history and culture. he would often crack jokes with government counter parts. not just in arabic but in the libyan dialect, which the libyans loved to hear him speak. another told me when i saw him in may as newly appointed ambassador in tripoli he had not changed, despite the promotion and accolades. he was the same guy. lingering one night after dinner to help me with a difficult table, i referred to him as sir or ambassador. he looked at me for a second, he sighs and he said i wish everyone would just call me chris. he loved the work, loved the people, but he never took himself too seriously. people talk about what a good diplomat he was. he knew how to motivate others to be the same. even those down on their careers, lost faith, in hardship. this was a tough task to inspire other to serve with dignity and self-respect. chris knew how to do that. nothing we can say here can make up for the heart ache and
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